How to print these articles

There are several methods to print these articles.

Using notepad or text editor:

Select text you want to print, copy it to the clipboard using CTL-C. Paste into notepad or your favorite text editor using CTL-V. Use your text editor to print.

Thursday, June 22, 2017

BHA and BHT in cosmetics

Butylated compounds, includes BHA and BHT are commonly found in cosmetics.

Butylated compounds are found in creams, lip products, makeup, hair products, sunscreen, fragrance, antiperspirant/deodorant, and more. Some studies have shown they can influence hormones in the body, can be toxic to some organs, can cause with child development, and may cause cancer. The compounds have many names, but here's one: butylated hydroxyanisole. It has a CAS No. 25013-16-5.

From the NTP report on Butylated Hydroxyanisole:
Dietary exposure to BHA caused benign and malignant tumors of the forestomach (papilloma and squamous-cell carcinoma) in rats of both sexes and in male mice and hamsters (IARC 1986, Masui et al. 1986). Since BHA was listed in the Sixth Annual Report on Carcinogens, an additional study in experimental animals has been identified. Dietary administration of BHA to fish (hermaphroditic Rivulus marmoratus) as larvae caused liver cancer (hepatocellular carcinoma) in the adult fish (Park et al. 1990).

Currently there is not enough data to say whether BHA causes cancer in humans, but gathering more data on this can  take years.

The best action to take is to avoid butylated compounds, and help your kids do the same. Check all lotions, chapstick, lip gloss, and anything they put on their skin.
 

Sources
  1. SafeCosmetics.org
  2. National Toxicology Program, “Report on Carcinogens, Twelfth Edition. Butylated Hydroxyanisole,” 2011. https://ntp.niehs.nih.gov/ntp/roc/content/profiles/butylatedhydroxyanisole.pdf. [Last accessed 6/12/2017].
  3. Environmental Working Group, “Skin Deep. Butylated Hydroxytoluene,” [Online]. Available: http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/700741/BHT/. [Accessed 20 June 2013].
  4. Environmental Working Group, “Skin Deep. Butylated Hydroxyanisole,” [Online]. Available: http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/700740/BHA/. [Accessed 20 June 2013].
  5. Labrador V et al., “Cytotoxicity of butylated hydroxyanisole in Vero cells,” Cell biology and toxicology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 189-99, 2007.
  6. Lanigan RS, Yamarik TA, “Final report on the safety of assessment of BHT (1),” International journal of toxicology, vol. 21, no. Suppl 2, pp. 19-94, 2002.
  7. Jeong SH et al, “Effects of butylated hydroxyanisole on the development and functions of reproductive system in rats,” Toxicology, vol. 208, no. 1, pp. 49-62, 2005.
  8. Masui T et al, “Sequential changes of the forestomach of F344 rats, Syrian golden hamsters, and B6C3F1 mice treated with butylated hydroxyanisole,” Japanese journal of cancer research, vol. 77, no. 11, pp. 1083-90, 1986.
  9. Botterweck AA, “Intake of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene and stomach cancer risk: results from analyses in the Netherlands Cohort Study,” Food and chemical toxicology, vol. 38, no. 7, pp. 599-605, 2000.

[1] National Toxicology Program, “Report on Carcinogens, Twelfth Edition. Butylated Hydroxyanisole,” 2011.
[2] Environmental Working Group, “Skin Deep. Butylated Hydroxytoluene,” [Online]. Available: http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/700741/BHT/. [Accessed 20 June 2013].
[3] Environmental Working Group, “Skin Deep. Butylated Hydroxyanisole,” [Online]. Available: http://www.ewg.org/skindeep/ingredient/700740/BHA/. [Accessed 20 June 2013].
[4] Labrador V et al., “Cytotoxicity of butylated hydroxyanisole in Vero cells,” Cell biology and toxicology, vol. 23, no. 3, pp. 189-99, 2007.
[5] Lanigan RS, Yamarik TA, “Final report on the safety of assessment of BHT (1),” International journal of toxicology, vol. 21, no. Suppl 2, pp. 19-94, 2002.
[6] Jeong SH et al, “Effects of butylated hydroxyanisole on the development and functions of reproductive system in rats,” Toxicology, vol. 208, no. 1, pp. 49-62, 2005.
[7] Masui T et al, “Sequential changes of the forestomach of F344 rats, Syrian golden hamsters, and B6C3F1 mice treated with butylated hydroxyanisole,” Japanese journal of cancer research, vol. 77, no. 11, pp. 1083-90, 1986.
[8] Botterweck AA, “Intake of butylated hydroxyanisole and butylated hydroxytoluene and stomach cancer risk: results from analyses in the Netherlands Cohort Study,” Food and chemical toxicology, vol. 38, no. 7, pp. 599-605, 2000. - See more at: http://www.safecosmetics.org/get-the-facts/chemicals-of-concern/butylated-compounds/#sthash.mC56wdYz.dpuf

Monday, June 19, 2017

FDA resumes testing foods for glyphosate

  1. The FDA is one of very few labs that can handle testing of lots of foods. But they need to release the data too, like the amount of glyphosate found in ppm. Very much like lead, there is no safe limit where a person can be exposed to glyphosate. The EPA limits of glyphosate exposure are fake, disingenuous, and dangerous. 
  2. Investigation started about collusion between top EPA official and Monsanto. Some people suspect data was cooked or data unfavorable to Monsanto was simply omitted in testing reports.
  3. A group of 20 scientists and doctors say glyphosate is not safe at any level.


Source
Huffington Post.

Saturday, June 17, 2017

New Spark drone only $500usd

Why is this a big deal? Because it has features of more expensive drones. The Spark from DJI has these high-end features:
  1. 16 minutes of battery life. (Not bad for a drone this size.)
  2. 12 megapixel camera (12 million pixels).
  3. HD 720p real-time Wi-Fi transmits video 2km away.
  4. Intuitive gesture controls so you can fly it without using a controller or smart phone. (I assume the camera would have to be looking at the user for this to work.)
  5. Built-in motion tracking to keep important people or objects in frame. 
  6. VPS range: 30m
  7. Transmission range: 2km (1.2 miles)
  8. Speed: 50km/h.
  9. 2 axis gimbal
  10. Requires smart phone to control: 
  11. First person view: YES. Supports DJI goggles.
  12. Return home function: YES.
  13. Quickshot modes for making videos. DRONIE: drone watches target and flies up and backwards. ROCKET: Drone points camera down and flies straight up. CIRCLE: circle around your target. HELIX: fly upward circling around your target. 
  14. TRACE: follow your subject from front or behind or circle around it. 
  15. PROFILE: follow subject from a fixed perspective.

But this drone is not for beginners. The Mavic Pro is $1000 and is the next smallest drone.

To be released June 15, 2017.

Source
Popular Mechanics. May 24, 2017.

Friday, June 16, 2017

White "pineapple" strawberries a bust

We recently got some straweberries that taste like "pineapple", at least that's what the tag says. When they are ripe they are white, with a slight blush, and the seeds turn red. But they just aren't that great, they just taste like sour strawberries.

Would not buy again.

Wednesday, June 14, 2017

PiTop: $89 open source laptop!

The PiTop is a laptop that has a Pine64 (similar to a Raspberry Pi) inside it. The PiTop has a 11.6" screen, keyboard, touch pad, 1.2MP camera, Bluetooth 4.0, and more. The MicroSD card slot supports up to 256GB cards. This is a low-end laptop with 2GB RAM, 12GB of storage, and it only runs Linux, not Windows. But there are many free apps for Linux like OpenOffice. This laptop will do fine for word processing, spreadsheets, but may not do great at streaming video.

The 11.6" screen version weights only 2.3lbs (1.04kg). 

This might be worth checking out. See full article here.

The main Pine64 site that sells the laptop.

Dicamba pesticide drift destroying more crops in Arkansas

  1. Dicamba spray can be lifted by the wind onto neighboring fields. This drifting spray is killing thousands of acres of cotton, soybeans, fruit trees, and more.
  2. Damage to people from dicamba shows up at much lower concentrations than originally though. (Source.)
  3. Insurance companies do not cover losses from dicamba. (See here.)
  4. And Monsanto has been sued over dead crops from spray drift.
  5. There has also been an assault over continued spray drift onto a neighboring field.

Source
Northwest Arkansas Democrat Gazette.

Monday, June 12, 2017

Friday, June 2, 2017

Bee-killing neonicitinoids approval violated the law

  1. A Federal Court in San Francisco has ruled that the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) systematically violated the Endangered Species Act (ESA) – a key wildlife protection law – when it approved bee-killing insecticides known as neonicotinoids.
  2. The EPA also has rules where the cost of approval (or non-approval) must also be taken into account. This lets industry influence the approval process far too much if the company asking for approval simply reports there is little cost associated with the pesticide.
  3. Judge Maxine Chesney of the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of California held that EPA had unlawfully issued 59 pesticide registrations between 2007 and 2012 for a wide variety of  uses.
  4. The more recent theory of bee colony collapse disorder is various pesticides, including neonicotinoids, harm the bees' immune system and allow infections of fungus and mite infestations on the bees, which eventually kills multiple hives. Hobby bee keepers have also reported large bee deaths when their hives are near a farmer's field.
  5. Neonics., as they are often called, can be sprayed on plants, and their flowers, and when bees touch the flowers the pesticide gets on them.
Source
Center for Food Safety.

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

1985 memo: Monsanto suspected glyphosate caused cancer

Twitter pic.

The letter is as follows:

April 3, 1985

To: T. F. Evans

The following item of information is in addition to those included in the current monthly report.

Senior management at EPA is reviewing a proposal to classify glyphosate as a class C "possible human carcinogen" because of kidney adenonomas in male mice. Dr. Marvin Kuschner will review kidney sections and present his evaluation of them to EPA in an effort to persuade the agency that the observed tumors are not related to glyphosate.

George J. Levinskas

cc: G Rousch Jr MD